Some religious institutions promote reparations

On May 4, 1969 James Forman, spokesman for the National Black Economic Development Conference (NBEDC), presented in the Christian church of Riverside in New York, United States, the Black Manifesto asking the white Christian churches and Jewish synagogues for five hundred million dollars of compensations for the African American population.
In the following decades there were occasional apologies by some religious institutions.

On December 8, 2000 the Sisters of Charity of Nazareth, the Sisters of Loretto at the Foot of the Cross and the Dominican Sisters of St. Catherine of Siena in Kentucky, United States, apologized for the use of slaves in the 19th century.

On July 9, 2015 Pope Francis in Bolivia asked […] humbly forgiveness, not only for the offenses of the Church herself, but also for crimes committed against the native peoples during the so-called conquest of America […].

On April 24, 2017 the Evangelical Church in Germany has asked the descendants of the victims of the genocide in then South-West Africa for forgiveness.

But only recently, fifty years after the presentation of the Black Manifesto, reparations by religious institutions have become more frequent.

On September 23, 2018 the Society of the Sacred Heart of Jesus in Grand Coteau, Louisiana, United States, commemorated with their descendants the slaves held in the 19th century by dedicating them a plaque in the museum, headstones in the parish cemetery and a scholarship for African-American students.

On April 11, 2019 two thirds of the students of the Catholic private university Georgetown University in Washington, United States, voted to raise tuition fees for the creation of a reparation fund, for the use of slaves in the 19th century, to finance scholarships for African American students.

On September 5, 2019 the Protestant Episcopal Theological Seminary in Virginia (VTS) in Alexandria, Virginia, United States, announced the creation of a reparation fund, for the use of slaves in the 19th century and the racial segregation in the 20th century, of one million seven hundred thousand dollars to finance scholarships for African American students and support for African American university staff and clergy.

On October 18, 2019 the Presbyterian Theological Seminary of Princeton (PTS) in Princeton, New Jersey, United States, announced the creation of a reparation fund, for the use of slaves in the 19th century by the founders and leaders, of twenty-seven million and six hundred thousand dollars to finance scholarships for African American students and support for African American university staff and study programs.

On October 29, 2019 the Catholic private university Georgetown University in Washington,United States, announced the creation of a reparation fund, for the use and then the sale of 272 slaves in 1838, of four hundred thousand dollars to finance reparatory measures to be defined within one year, severely criticized by Students For GU272 supported by GU272 Descendants Association.

On November 9, 2019 the Episcopal Diocese of New York, United States, approved some anti-slavery resolutions presented in 1860 and so far never approved and the creation of a reparation fund, for the use of slaves in the 19th century, of one million and one hundred thousand dollars to finance reparatory measures to be defined within a year.

On November 20, 2019 the Episcopal Diocese of Long Island, New York, United States, announced the creation of a reparation fund, for the use of slaves in the 19th century, of half a million dollars to finance scholarships for African American students.

On December 13, 2019 the Union for Reform Judaism (URJ) of the United States approved the creation of a federal commission for the study and development of reparatory measures for slavery and ongoing systemic racial injustices.

On February 12, 2020 the Episcopal Diocese of Texas, United States, announced the creation of a reparation fund, for the use of slaves in the 19th century, of thirteen million dollars to finance reconciliation projects and scholarships for African American students.

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